Williamsburg Color- Unstuffed

May 23, 2013

 

 

I was very pleased to get this news!  The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation has partnered with Benjamin Moore on a collection of 144 new colors– ” Based on original pigments developed more than 250 years ago, Colonial Williamsburg’s curators have re-created this rich, authentic palette.”  TREND MEETS TRADITION.

Take a look at a few of these colors, used in really fresh new settings not your mother’s (or grandmother’s house)!

 

 

Washington Blue and Cornwallis Red

 

Spotswood Teal, Everard Blue and Damask Yellow

 

 

Green Umber and Hardwood Putty

Damask Yellow

 

 

Carter Gray and Capitol White

 

Bracken Cream and Williamsburg Wythe Blue

 

Raleigh Peach

 

 

Gunsmith Gray and Mopboard Black 

 

Ewing Blue and Market Square Shell

 

Bone Black and Lamp Black

Carter Plum

 

Williamsburg Stone and Hardwood Putty

 

Williamsburg Wythe Blue, Palace Pearl and Claret

Tyler Gray and Palace Pearl

Tyler Gray and Palace Pearl

 

 

Greenhow Blue

 

 

So, I’m seeing some old favorites here but the palette has most definitely been “refreshed”.  I’m loving it!

 

 

 

 

The color I’m “dying to try”?   Definitely “Greenhow Vermillion”.

 

 

 

 

There are some great reds in the collection!

 

Am looking forward to getting some of these colors up soon…stay tuned!  For more background on the Collection..watch here:

 

 

 

 

all images via Benjamin Moore

 

 

 

Good Bones… Great Staging

May 8, 2013

 

 

Got a call a few weeks ago from my talented friend, Jane. Jane is a real estate agent but also a design maven with an incredible eye and has  done her fair share of residential home staging. She had a new listing but decided to outsource the paint color selection and staging to professionals.

 

 

 

This house, built in 1937, had been lived in and loved. It had exceptional light, views and great bones. But it definitely needed a major interior facelift (and some exterior tweaking) before going on the market.

 

 

 After:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grrr.. forgot to snap the “before” photos. Suffice to say that the palette was dated and involved pastel pink and blue. The pastels had worked with the previous owner’s furnishings and rugs but those wall colors had to go. In the living room, the elaborate moldings had been “picked out” in white– the effect– like icing on a wedding cake. We decided to temper the formalilty of the room by “painting out” the frame moldings and chair rail in the same color as the walls. I wanted the eye to be drawn up to the crown molding, so painted the ceiling a subtle color to highlight that and the height of the room.

 

 

 

The floors, a combination of original pine and oak, were refinished but left in their natural warm gold-orange tones. I used 5 different pale grays and off-whites on walls, ceilings and trim throughout the first floor to knock back the warmth of the floors and take advantage of the beautiful natural light.

 

 

Red House Staging did a fabulous job with clean contemporary furnishings and artwork… maintaining a neutral palette with lively pops of orange throughout the first floor.

 

 

 

 

The result is a subtle shift in light throughout the whole house. The shift creates just a bit of movement from the sight lines throughout  and makes the rooms flow seamlessly.

 

 

 

The stairway leading to the second floor was also layered in whites above and below the chair rail, stair risers were painted white and the handrail black.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The old pine floors give character to the new kitchen, wrapped in a warm white to match the cabinetry.

 

 

 

The walk-out basement got an uplift with a warm camel color–cozy and warm for watching TV in the evenings.

 

 

 

 

The master bedroom was painted in a pale green… dreamy and atmospheric with leafy views from all windows.

 

 

 

 

This was indeed, a transformation– with wall color highlighting the strengths of this classic Virginia home.  The result?  In one day….

 

 

 

 

I often talk about the paint colors I use on projects but have decided not to include them here. Why?  When using nuanced  “off-whites” it is essential to test– pale colors and whites look very different depending on the light source and flooring.  Attempting to replicate a look by simply using the same paint colors is often fraught with disappointment .  My advice?  The perfect white, especially when making a choice for interior or exterior trims,  can make or break a color scheme. Hire a professional and get it right the first time!